Tips in Diagnosing Yeast infection in Women

Tips in Diagnosing Yeast infection in Women

April 19, 2016 0 By pastordave

A woman’s body is an efficient piece of machinery – a machine made up of muscles, nerves, and bones. It can carry a baby in its womb for nine months and also deliver it. No matter how perfect a woman’s body is, it is still susceptible to diseases. Candidiasis, or vaginal yeast infection, is one of the most common ailments affecting women today. This article will be the original source to focus on catching the early signs of yeast infection in women.

Vaginal yeast infection is not caused by yeast. The infection itself is caused by yeast-like organism called Candida Albicans. In fact, it is not a type of bacteria or yeast. It is actually a fungus. Like any other organism, it is present in the human body at all times. They are considered beneficial in normal levels in the sense that they aid the digestion process and also help maintain balance of the natural flora in our bodies. Problems take place when it grows out of proportion.

Each organism in our body has a natural enemy – a sort of check-and-balance situation that occurs naturally. The whole infection starts when the bacteria limiting Candida Albicans dies. It may be due to a number of reasons, like antibiotics or a weakened immune system. Naturally, since its natural enemy is gone, it will begin to proliferate. This fungus tends to be very aggressive and grows rapidly. It has also been known to pass through muscle walls. This is how the vaginal infection begins.

Tips in Diagnosing Yeast infection in Women

To diagnose this infection successfully, one has to know the symptoms associated with it. The most obvious symptom is in the form of vaginal discharge. Many doctors liken this discharge with cottage cheese. It smells like bread or beer and it is whitish in color. Other symptoms are severe itching, soreness, and reddening of the areas affected. Simple routines like walking or urinating will be accompanied by burning sensation. Even sexual intercourse will become difficult. These symptoms may mean something else if experienced one at a time. But if experienced together, it is time to visit your obstetrician-gynecologist.

The doctor will question you about the symptoms and he or she will take a sample of the vaginal discharge. Once Candida has been determined to be the cause of the infection, treatment will begin. Please bear in mind that diagnosing yeast infection is very difficult. The symptoms may be another form of infection. Some of them might be even more dangerous than yeast infection. That is why proper medical attention must be undertaken once you feel any of the symptoms.